not a member? click here to sign up

The Weirdness

Kicking off in a rush of rudimentary riffs and cracked vocals, The Weirdness suggests all of your fears have come true: rock’s angriest mob have turned into toothless old sleazes, and it seems they’re the only ones not to realise it.

Rating: 5 / 10

Ed Power, 13 Mar 2007



Setting the standard for debauched nihilism, The Stooges cut a ragged dash through the proto-punk landscape of the early ‘70s. More than 30 years on, there’s something vaguely farcical and perhaps even tragic about the return of Iggy and the Asheton brothers. Kicking off in a rush of rudimentary riffs and cracked vocals, The Weirdness suggests all of your fears have come true: rock’s angriest mob have turned into toothless old sleazes, and it seems they’re the only ones not to realise it.

Not that The Weirdness is entirely a train wreck. Forget that this is The Stooges and the record yields its share of comedy punk kicks. Coasting on Iggy’s faux-Doors yelp and producer Steve Albini’s patented grindhouse din, opener ‘Trollin’’ , for instance, is a sloppily efficient bar blues workout. Elsewhere, ‘You Can’t Have Friends’ lumbers and twitches, as if the song had been buried in unhallowed ground for three decades and brought back to life through unholy means.

On the title-track, meanwhile, Iggy channels his inner Nick Cave, moaning and gibbering his way through a slow-burn dirge. For the first, and only, time on the record, the singer (now nudging 60) seems to be acting his age; the song hints at the fantastic gothic blues LP The Stooges could have crafted had they surrendered their leather trousers and Viagra at the studio door.

Though hardly the disaster it could have been, then, The Stooges’ return feels unnecessary and, more importantly, undignified. What ever happened to living off past glories?
Rating: 5 / 10

Artist Related Content

Latest Related Articles For This Artist

Feel the noise

That they sound this vicious after a three decade hiatus is a 50-something affront to Converse-sponsored plastic punkers whose only honourable response would be to slink away in a posture of abject humiliation. So here we will pay homage to the Stooge noise – a pent-up, piledriving, relentless, menacing, volatile, elemental, feral and utterly uninhibited din that manages to be equal parts industrial and organic.


REVIEW: 17 Jun 2004

best of ireland

Contact Us

Hot Press,
13 Trinity Street,
Dublin 2.
Rep. Of Ireland
Tel: +353 (1) 241 1500

Email:info@hotpress.ie

Click here for more contact information.

Click here to find out more about Hot Press

Hot Press always welcomes feed back so if you've got something to tell us click here.

Advertise With Us

For more detail on how to advertise with Hot Press click here or call us on +353 (1) 241 1540