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The printing press won.
The internet will win.
-- evil_giraffe 
10/04/09 at 01:29 
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 From : tricky Posted : 07/03/12 at 11:05
I just don't buy the line "we can't control what 3rd parties do" when they clearly facilitate it and make money off it. It is not fair that a copyright holder has to police every single service to make sure that they're material is not being carried by people. It's actually easy for the big guys to handle it who can spend the time to admin this shite, but for the small guy (lets say The Frames) who's stuff is uploaded and doesn't get the "special delete access" that the 180 "big guys" get.
 From : tricky Posted : 07/03/12 at 11:08
one way I do agree with him though is the whole it's a bit much indicting us when Microsoft, Rapidshare etc are still doing the same thing.
 From : tricky Posted : 07/03/12 at 11:13
the other point that he's right about is the hypocrisy in relation to Youtube.
 From : poppycock Posted : 08/03/12 at 10:21
If I were Niall Stokes, I'd be heading over to Garrison Chapel to negotiate a deal...
To prepare for the hot'n'sticky..
 From : poppycock Posted : 08/03/12 at 10:29
If we were really paranoid, we'd be taking all/any mone out of the bank, switching to gas, filling the petrol tank, collecting horses (there is an abandonment issue that could be solved there..) and carts.., buying gramaphones and washboards etc., etc., ... etc.

I think I'll just have a bath while there's still hot water.
 From : poppycock Posted : 08/03/12 at 10:30
mone = money ...
 From : poppycock Posted : 08/03/12 at 10:31
gramo grama...
there really is not an edit facility despite what tricky might tell you.
 From : number10 Posted : 08/03/12 at 17:08
Kim Dot Com doesn't exactly cut an impressive figure, does he? Of course he's right about the likes of YouTube and Microsoft being much bigger offenders. But looking at the girth of him he can hardly ask: 'Why do they always pick on the small guy?'
 From : evil_giraffe Posted : 10/03/12 at 11:30
I should stop complaining about the Times.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/weekend/2012/0310/122431 3099645.html
 From : number10 Posted : 12/03/12 at 00:05
It's a curious philosophy: just because you can, you do. I have loads of sympathy for the basic impulse to test every boundary but I'm not sure I buy it. Put it this way: I imagine there are far better ways of spending you time constructively.
 From : ttemme Posted : 12/03/12 at 15:40
i agree. like going to the j'cks or having a bath. algorithns bore the f*ck out o' me.
 From : evil_giraffe Posted : 13/03/12 at 18:25
Statutory Instrument No. 59 of 2012, meet the Internet,

Internet, this is Statutory Instrument No. 59 of 2012.

http://www.broadsheet.ie/2012/03/13/what-this-sneaker-can-t each-old-and-new-media-about-love/#comments

"On Friday reader ‘Simon’ sent us news of a Nike runner called Black & Tan (above). The Irish Times picked up the story and an Old media/New Media viral thing happened. There was no credit for ‘Simon’ or us.

Which happened to be entirely cool as this is the interwebs.

We mention this as we have just got an email from the ‘editor’s office’ of the Irish Times asking us to remove an Irish Times photo we used on our site in 2010. A picture of the journalist Alison O’Riordan. We printed the photo a number of times without permission.

But the chap also asked us (quite sternly) to remove about a dozen of the amusing variations of the photo, known to you and me as ‘memes’.

Memes such as these. And this. Much like the ones the Irish Times was heralding as satirical gold a few short months ago."
 From : hydra Posted : 13/03/12 at 23:55
The printing press lost - end thread
 From : evil_giraffe Posted : 25/03/12 at 11:59
http://www.marcandangel.com/2010/11/15/12-dozen-places-to-s elf-educate-yourself-online/

12 Dozen Places To Educate Yourself Online For Free

Science and Health

MIT OpenCourseWare – MIT OpenCourseWare is a free web-based publication of MIT course materials that reflects almost all the undergraduate and graduate subjects taught at MIT.

Tufts OpenCourseWare– Tufts OpenCourseWare is part of a new educational movement initiated by MIT that provides free access to course content for everyone online. Tufts’ course offerings demonstrate the University’s strength in the life sciences in addition to its multidisciplinary approach, international perspective and underlying ethic of service to its local, national and international communities.

HowStuffWorks Science – More scientific lessons and explanations than you could sort through in an entire year.

Harvard Medical School Open Courseware – The mission of the Harvard Medical School Open Courseware Initiative is to exchange knowledge from the Harvard community of scholars to other academic institutions, prospective students, and the general public.

Khan Academy – Over 1200 videos lessons covering everything from basic arithmetic and algebra to differential equations, physics, chemistry, and biology.

Open Yale Courses – Open Yale Courses provides lectures and other materials from selected Yale College courses to the public free of charge via the internet. The courses span the full range of liberal arts disciplines, including humanities, social sciences, and physical and biological sciences.

webcast.berkeley – Every semester, UC Berkeley webcasts select courses and events for on-demand viewing via the Internet. webcast.berkeley course lectures are provided as a study resource for both students and the public.

UC San Deigo Podcast Lectures – UCSD’s podcasting service was established for instructional use to benefit our students. Podcasts are taken down at the end of every quarter (10 weeks Fall-Spring and 5 weeks in the summer). If you’re enjoying a podcast, be sure to subscribe and download the lectures. Once the podcast has been taken offline, faculty rarely approve their reposting.

Johns Hopkins OpenCourseWare – The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s OpenCourseWare project provides access to content of the School’s most popular courses. As challenges to the world’s health escalate daily, the School feels a moral imperative to provide equal and open access to information and knowledge about the obstacles to the public’s health and their potential solutions.

Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative – No instructors, no credits, no charge. Use these self-guiding Carnegie Mellon materials and activities to learn at your own pace.

Utah State OpenCourseWare – Utah State OpenCourseWare is a collection of educational material used in our formal campus courses, and seeks to provide people around the world with an opportunity to access high quality learning opportunities.

AMSER – AMSER (the Applied Math and Science Education Repository) is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

Wolfram Demonstrations Project – Wolfram brings computational exploration to the widest possible audience, open-code resource that uses dynamic computation to illuminate concepts. Free player runs all demos and videos.

The Science Forum – A very active scientific discussion and debate forum.

Free Science and Video Lectures Online! – A nice collection of video lectures and lessons on science and philosophy.

Science.gov – Science.gov searches over 42 databases and over 2000 selected websites from 14 federal agencies, offering 200 million pages of authoritative U.S. government science information including research and development results.

The National Science Digital Library – NSDL is the Nation’s online library for education and research in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics.

EnviroLink Network– A non-profit organization, grassroots online community uniting organizations and volunteers around the world. Up-to-date environmental information and news.

Geology.com – Information about geology and earth science to visitors without charge: Articles, News, Maps, Satellite Images, Dictionary, etc.

Scitable – A free science library and personal learning tool that currently concentrates on genetics, the study of evolution, variation, and the rich complexity of living organisms. The site also expects to expand into other topics of learning and education.

LearningScience.org – A free open learning community for sharing newer and emerging tools to teach science.

Business and Money

MIT Sloan School of Management – MIT Sloan is a world-class business school long renowned for thought leadership and the ability to successfully partner theory and practice. This is a subsection of the larger MIT OpenCourseWare site.

Investopedia Financial Investing Tutorials – A plethora of detailed lessons on money management and investing.

U.S. Small Business Administration Training Network – The Small Business Administration has one of the best selections of business courses on the web. Topics include everything from starting a business and business management to government contracting and international trade. Most courses take only 30 minutes to complete.

VideoLectures.NET (Business) – A free and open access educational video lectures repository. The lectures are given by distinguished scholars and scientists at the most important and prominent events like conferences, summer schools, workshops and science promotional events from many fields of Science.

My Own Business, Inc. – Offers a free online business administration course that would be beneficial to new managers and to anyone who is interested in starting a business. This comprehensive course is split up into 16 sessions covering topics like business plans, accounting, marketing, insurance, e-commerce and international trade.

UC Irvine OpenCourseWare (Business) – Rapidly with the addition of nearly 10 new courses every month. Many of our OCW offerings are directed at working adults seeking continuing education, with the option to enroll in instructor-led, for-credit courses, related to the OCW content.

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania – The Kutztown University of Pennsylvania’s Small Business Development Center offers more than 80 free business courses online. Kutztown’s courses are individualized and self-paced. Many of the courses feature high-end graphics, interactive case studies and audio streams.

Boston College Front Row (Business) – Boston College Front Row is a Web site that offers free access through streaming media to tapes of cultural and scholarly events at Boston College.

Financial Management Training Center – The Financial Management Training Center provides several free downloadable business courses for people who need to learn the finer points of financial management. All courses offered can be taken online; courses include full exams as well as evaluation forms for people seeking Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

The Free Nonprofit Micro-eMBA – Free Management Library’s Free Nonprofit Micro-eMBA Program is an especially great resource for students wishing to learn more about nonprofit management, but most of the lessons also apply to general business management. Completion of this program will not result in an MBA degree, but enrollment is free and the material is well structured.

Bookboon Free Business e-books – Hundreds of free business books online in PDF format.

TheStreet University – If you’re just starting out as a stock and bond investor or need a refresher’s course, this is the place to learn what you need to know.

History and World Culture

University of Washington’s OpenUW – Explore a variety of learning in several free history-centric online courses from the University of Washington.

Notre Dame OpenCourseWare – Notre Dame OCW is a free and open educational resource for faculty, students, and self-learners throughout the world.

Bio’s Best – Biography.com’s most popular biographies on notable historical figures.

UC Irvine OpenCourseWare (Social Science) – Rapidly with the addition of nearly 10 new courses every month. Many of our OCW offerings are directed at working adults seeking continuing education, with the option to enroll in instructor-led, for-credit courses, related to the OCW content.

Boston College Front Row (History) – Boston College Front Row is a Web site that offers free access through streaming media to tapes of cultural and scholarly events at Boston College.

MIT OpenCourseWare (History) – The MIT History Faculty offers about 70 subjects in the areas of Ancient, North American, European, East Asian, and Middle Eastern history.

Wikiversity School of Social Sciences – Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation project devoted to learning resources, learning projects, and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university, including professional training and informal learning.

OpenLearn (Arts and Humanities) – The OpenLearn website gives free access to Open University course materials.

A Biography of America – A Biography of America presents history not simply as a series of irrefutable facts to be memorized, but as a living narrative of America’s story.

Have Fun with History – A resource for students, educators and all lovers of American History.

The USGenWeb Project – Free genealogy and family history resources online.

MacroHistory and World Report – Tell without illusions or ideological restraints the story of our ancestors, our parents and us.

World History HyperHistory – Navigates through 3000 years of World History with links to important persons and events of world historical importance.

American Digital History – Online American history textbook. An interactive, multimedia history of the United States from the Revolution to the present.

Law

Duke Law Center for the Public Domain – Duke University is counted amongst the best schools in the South. If you’re interested in law, Duke’s open courseware in that subject area can go a long way towards helping you learn more about the justice system.

Intute Law – Provides free access to high quality resources on the Internet. Each resource has been evaluated and categorised by subject specialists based at UK universities.

Boston College Front Row (Law) – Boston College Front Row is a Web site that offers free access through streaming media to tapes of cultural and scholarly events at Boston College.

American University – Offers a selection of podcasts on a number of different law-related subjects. There is even a very interesting podcast on debt relief and the law.

Lewis & Clark Law School – Provides a number of podcast from the law school. Subjects include tax law, business law, environmental law and other areas of law. Interesting and insightful lectures on the law.

Case Western Reserve University School of Law – Offers a number of interesting lectures on different law subjects. These lectures are both podcasts and Web casts. You can look ahead to the coming school year, which already has a number of interesting subjects lined up.

Harvard Law School – Provides a number of Web casts of law lectures, symposia, panels and conferences. A great collection of relevant information and insights on how the law interacts with current events.

Stanford Law – Provides open courseware via iTunes on a variety of law subjects, including the theory of justice, mobile content distribution, gay marriage, judicial review and privacy protection. The tracks are available for free, but you’ll need iTunes. Put the lectures on your iPod or iPhone and listen them anywhere.

MoneyInstructor Business Law – From MoneyInstructor.com provides a look at a number of basics in business law. Learn how to define crimes under business law. Worksheets and curriculums are available for teachers. Ordinary folks will find them useful as well.

Wesleyan College Constitutional Law – From North Carolina Wesleyan College offers an overview of the U.S. Constitution and the laws springing from it. Online lectures and class notes are included, which can help you develop a strong understanding of the Constitution and how it forms the basis of our laws.

Computer Science and Engineering

VideoLectures.NET (Computer Science) – A free and open access educational video lectures repository. The lectures are given by distinguished scholars and scientists at the most important and prominent events like conferences, summer schools, workshops and science promotional events from many fields of Science.

Wikiversity School of Computer Science and Technology – Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation project devoted to learning resources, learning projects, and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university, including professional training and informal learning.

New York State University (US), Computer Science – Hundreds of lectures, tutorials and links to educational material.

Dream.In.Code Tutorials – Lots of computer programming tutorials.

MIT OpenCourseWare (Engineering and Computer Science) – MIT OpenCourseWare is a free web-based publication of MIT course materials that reflects almost all the undergraduate and graduate subjects taught at MIT.

Maine University (US), Fogler Guide to Computer Science – An insanely detailed list of computer science resources.

FreeComputerBooks.com – Free computer, mathematics, technical books and lecture notes.

Collection of Computer Science Bibliographies – A massive collection of bibliographies of scientific literature in computer science, updated weekly from original locations, more than 3 millions of references (mostly to journal articles, conference papers and technical reports), clustered in about 2000 bibliographies.

W3Schools – Web-building tutorials, from basic HTML and XHTML to advanced XML, SQL, Database, Multimedia and WAP.

FreeTechBooks.com – This site lists free online computer science, engineering and programming books, textbooks and lecture notes, all of which are legally and freely available over the Internet.

Free computer Tutorials – Free computer courses and tutorials site. All the courses are aimed at complete beginners, so you don’t need experience to get started.

Programmer 101: Teach Yourself How to Code – Several helpful resources for computer programming beginners.

Google Code University – Provides sample course content and tutorials for Computer Science (CS) students and educators on current computing technologies and paradigms.

Mathematics

Oxford University Mathematics OpenCourseWare – Various online mathematics classes provided free by Oxford University.

UMass Boston Mathematics – Various online mathematics classes provided free by UMass Boston.

Whatcom Online Math Center – Various math lessons provided free by Whatcom Community College.

VideoLectures.NET (Mathematics) – A free and open access educational video lectures repository. The lectures are given by distinguished scholars and scientists at the most important and prominent events like conferences, summer schools, workshops and science promotional events from many fields of Science.

Wikiversity School of Mathematics – Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation project devoted to learning resources, learning projects, and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university, including professional training and informal learning.

AMSER Mathematics – AMSER (the Applied Math and Science Education Repository) is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

Math.com – Math.com is dedicated to providing revolutionary ways for students, parents, teachers, and everyone to learn math.

Intute Mathematics – Provides free access to high quality resources on the Internet. Each resource has been evaluated and categorized by subject specialists based at UK universities.

Free-Ed College Mathematics – Offers a wide range of free online math courses and study programs.

English and Communications

Open Yale Courses (English) – Open Yale Courses provides lectures and other materials from selected Yale College courses to the public free of charge via the internet.

Writing Guidelines for Engineering and Science Students – These guidelines for engineering writing and scientific writing are designed to help students communicate their technical work.

MIT Writing and Humanistic Studies – The MIT Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies gives students the opportunity to learn the techniques, forms, and traditions of several kinds of writing, from basic expository prose to more advanced forms of non-fictional prose, fiction and poetry, science writing, scientific and technical communication and digital media.

Merriam-Webster Online – In this digital age, your ability to communicate with written English is paramount skill. And M-W.com is the perfect resource to improve your English now.

National Novel Writing Month – Valuing enthusiasm and perseverance over painstaking craft, NaNoWriMo is a novel-writing program for everyone who has thought fleetingly about writing a novel but has been scared away by the time and effort involved.

Lifewriting – A complete text of the 9-week writing class a professor taught for years at UCLA.

Guide to Grammar and Writing – Grammar and writing techniques, lessons and quizzes.

Purdue Online Writing Lab – Over 200 free resources including lessons on: writing, research, grammar, and style guides.

Foreign and Sign Languages

BBC Languages – Teach yourself a new spoken language online.

American Sign Language Browser – Teach yourself sign language online.

Livemocha – Start learning a new language online for free.

Learn10 – Gives you a language learning habit that’s hard to kick. 10 new words; everywhere, every day.

One Minute Languages – Learn a new language via podcasts that are updated regularly.

Mango Languages – Over 100 lessons, shown to you in PowerPoint style with interstitial quizzes, to move you through any language without cracking a book.

Multiple Subjects and Miscellaneous

OpenLearn – The OpenLearn website gives free access to Open University course materials. Multiple subjects are covered.

Capilano University OpenCourseWare – The Capilano University OpenCourseWare site is a free and open educational resource for faculty, students, and self-learners throughout the world.

University of Southern Queensland’s OpenCourseWare – Provides access to free and open educational resources for faculty members, students, and self-learners throughout the world.

YouTube EDU – Educational videos on YouTube organized by subject matter.

LearnHub Test Prep – Raise your test scores with free practice tests & counseling on various subjects.

iTunes U – Hundreds of universities — including Stanford, Yale and MIT — distribute lectures, slide shows, PDFs, films, exhibit tours and audio books through iTunes U. The Science section alone contains content on topics including agriculture, astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics, ecology and geography.

United Nations University OpenCourseWare – Showcases the training and educational programs implemented by the University in a wide range of areas relevant to the work of the United Nations.

Brigham Young Independent Study – BYU Independent Study now offers free courses in different areas of study. These areas include Family History, Family Life, and Religious Scripture Study, Personal Dev elopement, etc. Use these courses as a starting point for your personal studies or just to add insight to an area of interest.

University of Utah OpenCourseWare [linky no worky] – Provides access to free and open educational resources for faculty members, students, and self-learners throughout the world.

United States Nation Archives – The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation’s record keeper. Valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you.

Wikiversity – Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation project devoted to learning resources, learning projects, and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university, including professional training and informal learning.

UMass Boston OpenCourseWare – Various online classes provided free by UMass Boston.

About U – A collection of free online educational courses from About.com.

Academic Earth – Online degrees and video courses from leading universities.

Free-Ed – Clusters of courses that support your preparation for today’s fastest-growing careers and critical academic disciplines.

Connexions – A place to view and share educational material made of small knowledge chunks called modules that can be organized as courses, books, reports, etc. Anyone may view or contribute.

TED – Motivational and educational lectures from noteworthy professionals around the world.

Intute – Provides free access to high quality resources on the Internet. Each resource has been evaluated and categorised by subject specialists based at UK universities.

Boston College Front Row – Boston College Front Row is a Web site that offers free access through streaming media to tapes of cultural and scholarly events at Boston College.

Free Books and Reading Recommendations

LibraryThing – LibraryThing connects you to other people who are reading what you’re reading and allows you to see which books are popular in various categories of reading.

Textbook Revolution – Links to free online textbooks and other educational materials.

Book TV – This is the companion site to Book TV on C-Span2. The site holds some current interviews with authors, many past interviews, opinions, reviews, and featured programs through online video.

Bookboon – Bookboon provides online textbooks for students in PDF format. The free ebooks can be downloaded without registration. Our books are legal and written exclusively for Bookboon. They are financed by a few in-book ads.

Scribd – Scribd, the online document sharing site which supports Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and other popular formats. You can download a document or embed it in your blog or web page.

BookYards – BookYards is a web portal in which books, education materials, information, and content will be freely to anyone who has an internet connection.

Planet eBook [linky no worky] – Free classic literature to download and share.

E-Books Directory – Thousands of ebooks on various subjects to download and share.

Read Print Library – Free online books library for students, teachers, and the classic enthusiast.

GoodReads – Get great book recommendations and keep track of what you want to read.

The Online Books Page – University of Pennsylvania database with over 30,000 books.

Public Literature – Thousands of familiar classics, children’s books, plays and poems, as well as books by new authors.

Full Books – Thousands of full-text nonfiction and fiction books.

Many Books – Free fiction and nonfiction ebooks for your PDA, iPod or ebook reader.

Get Free Books – Thousands of free ebooks to download.

Project Gutenberg – More than 20,000 free books from the first producer of free e-books.

Bibliomania – Thousands of classic books, poems, short stories and plays.

Classic Reader – Large collection of free classic books, plays, and short stories from more than 300 authors.

Bartleby Fiction – Classic anthologies and volumes.

The Personal MBA Recommended Reading List – MBA programs don’t have a monopoly on advanced business knowledge: you can teach yourself everything you need to know to succeed in life and at work. The Personal MBA features the very best business books available, based on thousands of hours of research.

Books Should Be Free – Free audio books from the public domain.

Educational Mainstream Broadcast Media

BBC Learning – Online learning, support, and advice. This site offers internal and offsite links to a vast amount of materials.

Biography – The site holds videos to past interviews and biographies on people in topics that range from Black history to women’s history.

Book TV – This is the companion site to Book TV on C-Span2. The site holds some current interviews with authors, many past interviews, opinions, reviews, and featured programs through online video.

CBC Archives — Relive Canadian history through thousands of available radio and television clips.

Discovery — This channel is home to several different networks that focus on the military, animals, travel, etc. The Discovery site offers a “Video of the Day” from its home page, a separate online video section, and a Discover Education center where teachers can accumulate materials for K-12 teaching. It’s impossible to list all their offerings here, so go discover!

History Channel – Visit the Video Gallery for a selection on historical topics. Like the Discovery Channel, this network provides many opportunities for you to gain access to information and reference materials.

NOVA — Watch current science shows or browse by category. PBS sponsors this channel.

Research Channel — Speakers, researchers and professors present revolutionary thoughts and discoveries. Use their Webstreams and an extensive video-on-demand library for research.

Weather Channel – You can learn about weather all over the world, but the Weather Channel also offers dynamic content based upon seasons and special conditions and a special multimedia and education section.

Online Archives

American Memory – The Library of Congress provides extensive multimedia offerings on various topics through their American Memory Collection, including their outstanding Built in America project that showcases historical buildings through photographs.

Fathom – This archive, provided by Columbia University, offers access to the complete range of free content developed for Fathom by its member institutions. The archives include online learning resources including lectures, articles, interviews, exhibits and seminars.

Internet Archive Open Educational Resources – A digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form.

National Archives – Provides primary source materials from NARA along with lesson plans for teaching with those sources.

National Climatic Data Center – The NCDC, a division of NOAA, maintains climatic archives, including lists of storms in given counties, and records about global extremes, etc.

The Rosetta Project– A global collaboration of language specialists and native speakers building a publicly accessible online archive of all documented human languages.

September 11 Digital Archive – This site uses electronic media to collect, preserve, and present the history of the 9/11 attacks.

U.S. Census Bureau – If you think the Census Bureau is all about numbers, you might be surprised to learn about their archived photographs, daily radio features, and more available through their Newsroom.

Directories of Open Education

Google Scholar – Provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. From one place, you can search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites.

OpenCourseWare Consortium – This site provides a portal to search through hundreds of free courses or to add new courses you know about to the database.

iBerry – Check out this site for a huge directory of open courseware organized by school and subject matter that can point you in the right direction for any type of learning.

Self Made Scholar Directory – Free online directory of web-based classes and courses.
 From : tornaxx Posted : 25/03/12 at 14:52
...If you're a dolehead who doesn't have to work for a living...
 From : number10 Posted : 25/03/12 at 18:34
is that the longest post in history?
 From : hydra Posted : 26/03/12 at 12:22
And he had to link all those himself.

I'll buy him a pint from all of us as thanks next time I see him.
 From : evil_giraffe Posted : 26/03/12 at 12:34
An hour and a half of Click, Ctrl+v, Click, Ctrl+v.

Just in case the original post disappears….like all the links in the end of the world thread.
 From : evil_giraffe Posted : 06/01/13 at 21:42
Worth visiting the site below for the hyperlinks, pictures and videos. I reproduce (pirate, whatever) the entire text here in case it disappears.

http://www.pbs.org/idealab/2009/11/changes-in-media-over-th e-past-550-years318.html

Changes in Media Over the Past 550 Years
David Sasaki

I recently received an email from NowPublic, a popular citizen journalism website in North America, with the subject "Now Hiring." This is a rare thing in the field of journalism these days - citizen or traditional - and so I wanted to see what they are paying for and how they are covering the expenses. It turns out that NowPublic is not paying you to be a journalist - that is, not to publish content, but rather to read it. And, more importantly, to get others to read it. They will pay you for "views, visitors, and ad clicks." And they will pay you to refer others to view content and click on ads. In economic terms we would say they are paying to create a false demand for an overabundant supply.

For me, this exemplifies the state of news media: there is now, for the first time in the history of the world, an abundance of content and a scarcity of attention. But how did we get here? To better understand that we need to go back to 1435 in Northern France when Jean Miélot, a French priest and scholar, first began working as a scribe for Philip the Good, the Duke of Burgundy.

Since the invention of the papyrus scroll in Egypt over 4,000 years ago, this is how books were always produced: by hand, and one by one. Scribes almost always worked either for the church or for the aristocracy, and so princes and priests decided which books were to be copied, and which were to be banned. In 1435 Jean Miélot was given what was at the time thought to be a very prestigious job, just as prestige was associated with journalism as little as five years ago.

But then something happened. Just one year after Jean Miélot was given his job as a scribe for the Duke of Burgundy, a German goldsmith named Johannes Gutenberg began working on a new invention. Taking inspiration from mechanical presses that helped produce olive oil and wine, Gutenberg invented movable type, which allowed for the mass production of books. In retrospect, it is hard to overstate the importance of this invention in Europe and, eventually, throughout the world. Previously it took months just to produce a single copy of a book. Now in a week you could create thousands.

Slowly, ever so slowly, books began to spread across Europe. In the 1440's, 50's, and 60's the book was the new media of the day. And just like it has taken the world a long time to understand the power of the internet, it took Europe many decades to understand the social impact of the printed book.

There is a great irony that Johannes Gutenberg is best known for printing the Gutenberg Bible in the 1450's. Previously, every bible was hand copied by scribes, and only priests and princes had access to what was considered the great book of wisdom. Other Europeans depended on priests to transmit the contents of the bible during their weekly sermons. I say that there is irony in the Gutenberg Bible because the Gutenberg printing press was eventually responsible for taking power away from the Vatican and the Catholic Church.

70 years after the Gutenberg Bible was published it finally became common for European authors to publish their own books using the printing press. Martin Luther was one author to do that. In 1522 he published a translation of the Bible in German rather than standard Latin. This was a direct challenge to the power of the Catholic church. Instead of relying on the few trained priests and scholars who spoke Latin, the Bible was now accessible to all literate Germans.

He then published his 95 Theses which quickly spread all over Europe, led to the Protestant Reformation, and the fall of the Vatican as the center of power in Europe. Without the printing press the Reformation could not have never happened.

Nor would have the Scientific Revolution of the 17th century or the Enlightenment of the 18th century. Both movements depended on the rapid and broad dissemination of ideas such as Copernicus' On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, Vesalius' On the fabric of the human body in seven books and Descartes' Discourse on the Method. Perhaps the scientific revolution was actually ready to spread much earlier, but there was no way for the thinkers to publish, share, and build on the ideas of others.

And, of course, there would be no journalism were it not for the printing press. This is a copy of the London Gazette, which was the first regularly published newspaper, and began as the Oxford Gazette in 1665.

The point that I am trying to make is that some technological innovations are so revolutionary that they change everything. The Gutenberg Press led to the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, journalism, the Enlightenment, and, arguably, representative democracy. It created what is today a European continent with near universal literacy.

Before movable type, Europeans depended on priests to know what was inside of a book. Now they simply open its cover. That is a revolutionary difference. But what is important to remember is that not everyone benefited from the printing press. Scribes all across Europe protested. There aren't good records of their protests, but I can just imagine their reasoning: that people would be overwhelmed by too much information; that they would become isolated reading at home rather than coming to church; that mediocrity would prevail if publishing was put into the hands of ordinary people. Basically, all of the same criticisms we hear of the Internet today. In the end, the scribes lost and the printing press won. With the benefit of historical perspective, we view the result as inevitable. And we are seeing the same dynamic play out today with traditional journalism and the participatory internet.

In the US a major newspaper closes down just about every week. Those that haven't closed down yet are all losing money. There is no single major newspaper in the US right now that isn't losing money. The question isn't if the old model of journalism will die out, but when.

Which brings me to the next topic: that the World Wide Web is proving itself to be just as disruptive of a technology today as the Gutenberg Press was in the 15th century. The internet is growing up. There are now more Chinese internet users online than Americans.

Pew Internet found that one out of every five internet users in the United States uses a service like Facebook or Twitter to regularly update their status. For Ukrainians it might be LiveJournal and Kontact.

Two American researchers, Denis G. Pelli and Charles Bigelow, argue that we are charting a path toward "nearly universal authorship." In their study they charted the rise of book authors per year from 1400 to today and compared that data with the number of blog authors, Facebook authors, and Twitter authors over the past ten years. As you can see in the above chart, it took 600 years to reach one million book authors per year. In contrast, it only took five years to reach a million blog authors, three years to reach a million Facebook authors, and two years to reach a million Twitter authors. What will be next?

There are some technological innovations are so revolutionary that they change everything.

What is the role of media if everyone is part of the production process? I believe that we will continue to see a rise in what Jessica Clark of the Center for Social Media calls "people centric media," which spreads information, communication, and social capital across networks based on location, issues, and events. But how will media organizations and projects survive in an era where content is so abundant that no one is willing to pay for it? I want to stress that no matter how many conferences are held and white papers are published, there will never be a silver bullet to save the media industry. It is as useless of a task as convening scribes in the 15th century to discuss how they can save their industry. However, several new models and strategies are emerging which offer a glimpse into the future of people centric media.

Make the readers the journalists. In August 2008 the New York Times published a beautiful visualization of the final subway stops for every subway line in New York City. To do this they sent out reporters to take pictures, collect audio, and file their reports. A year later, a similar project called Mapping Main Street accepts contributions from anyone. It still requires an editor and designer, but in Mapping Main Street there is no distinction between reader and reporter.

Remove unnecessary reporters. Newspapers used to hire reporters to go to the police department, ask for the crime report, and then copy and publish it in the newspaper. Today that information can be published immediately and directly. Everyblock scrapes information from government websites and makes it available for ordinary citizens via web browser and mobile phone. Just as Europeans used to have to rely on priests to understand what was in a book, citizens used to rely on newspapers to understand about their community. Now they can see and engage with the information for themselves.

Remove unnecessary editors. Newspapers have a limited amount of space. Editors had to decide what was included in that space and what wasn't. They were the ultimate gatekeepers of the day's news. Today we are not limited by space, but rather time and attention. NewsTrust is a collaborative editorial site open to anyone which seeks to collectively rank the most relevant and trustworthy news.

Some reporting will always be expensive. For example, a 13,000 word New York Times article on events at Memorial Medical Center following Hurricane Katrina took two years and $400,000 to produce. With a $35.6 million loss last quarter, the New York Times can't invest $400k in a single story. Fortunately for the Times, a non-profit organization called ProPublica footed most of the bill. ProPublica is funded by billionaire Herb Sandler who founded the Sandler Foundation in October 2006 after he got out of the finance and mortgage industry. (Good timing!)

Get your local community to fund local reporting. You can either get a few very wealthy individuals/organizations to fund your work, or you can get many people to donate a small amount of money to pay a journalist to report a story. This is the model of San Fransisco-based Spot.us, which describes itself as "community funded reporting." Any journalist can make a pitch on the site about a story that he or she would like to report on. For example, in early July Lindsey Hoshaw was given an opportunity to board a ship to visit the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and report on it for the New York Times. But apparently, neither she nor the New York Times had the $10,000 to pay for the travel expenses. And so Hoshaw recorded a video of herself explaining why the reporting was important, why people should pitch in to help her cover the story.

Ellen Miller, the executive director of the Sunlight Foundation, pitched in $20. Tim O'Reilly, a well-known open source technologist and publisher, pitched in $100. Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, pitched in $100. Craig Newmark, the founder of Craigslist, pitched in $50. Zoe Keating, a well known cellist offered another $20. Jennifer 8. Lee, a reporter for the metro section of the New York Times, donated $30. (Perhaps she felt bad that the New York Times was still able to pay her, but not Hoshaw.)

Four months after Hoshaw made her pitch on Spot.us her story was published in the New York Times with an accompanying slideshow.

Give some away for free, charge for the rest. This is the business model that is mentioned most often these days as a way to keep news organizations afloat. It is the strategy of GlobalPost, an international news site. You can go there now and read more articles for free than you likely have time for. But if you're a real international news junkie, then you can pay an extra $200 a year for their "Passport" membership, which "offers an entrée into GlobalPost's inner circle." A couple weeks ago GlobalPost founder Phil Balboni claimed that so far they have 500 paying subscribers to Passport. He also claimed that GlobalPost is on pace to generate $1 million in revenue this yaer. (Their annual expenses are $5 million.)

At Global Voices the majority of our expenses are covered by private philanthropic foundations. The rest of our funding comes from four other sources: content commissions and underwriting, advertising, consulting, and online donations.

As you can see, it is becoming more and more difficult to find funding to support both media organizations and journalistic coverage. Then again, it might prove to be even more difficult to find anyone to pay attention to what you publish. It seems that the scarcity of attention is even more severe than the scarcity of funding.
 From : number10 Posted : 08/01/13 at 17:29
All very interesting!

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